Iron Maiden Amp Settings And Sounds

The heavy British machine known as Iron Maiden is as iconic as it comes. Three guitarists performing together will produce nothing less than a massive sound overall.

But how can you reproduce that sound when Iron Maiden amp settings are hard to come by?

In this guide, we are going to look at a few different ways you can grab that tone with your amp, and how to work out a few issues along the way.

Iron Maiden amp settings

What Is Iron Maiden’s Sound?

Iron Maiden is known for their classic, loud, and heavy sound. They use a lot of distortion and power chords to create a thick, full tone. If you’re looking to recreate this sound, you’ll need to start with the right amp and settings.

Adrian Smith, Dave Murray, and Janick Gers have more of a heavy British tone that is quite thick in the mid-range. To obtain this sound, the amplifier would normally be cranked wide open or boosted to get the roar of the tubes.

And while their sound has slightly changed over the years, a great place to start with amp settings would be something like:

  • Gain: 7-8
  • Treble: 6
  • Mids: 8
  • Bass: 4
  • Presence: 5

An amplifier that is less scooped sounding would benefit from this setting the most. However, with a high mid-range setting, most amps can make this work. From here, adjust it based on the guitar and amp that you are using until it sounds the way you like.

How Should You Recreate Iron Maiden Amp Settings?

Now that we have touched briefly on their sound, how do you go about creating your own Iron Maiden amp settings?

There are a few things you need to consider when trying to create the perfect settings to get this type of sound.

  1. Think about the amplifier you’re using. Does it have enough gain to provide the amount of distortion you want? If not, you may need to look at another amplifier or overdrive pedal.
  2. Consider the guitar you’re using. Is it a model that can provide the right output level and a sound thick enough? If not, then the Iron Maiden tone may be hard to capture.

Then, you need to know how the controls on your amp work. Knowing what they do and how they adjust your sound is crucial to getting this right.

Iron maiden Amp Setting infographic

Gain Control

The gain knob is the most important control on your amp when it comes to Iron Maiden’s heavy sound. This is because it needs to be up fairly high to produce the right amount of saturation and distortion.

But that means other frequencies will also be higher as a result. The bass frequencies are normally larger in intensity when the gain control is turned up. This is just the way the circuit responds in a high-gain amplifier.

If you are not careful, the sound could lose clarity and become muddy quickly. So when adjusting this control, make sure to keep this in mind as the EQ will also need to be dialed in accordingly.

Equalization

When setting up your amp for any music style, you should always begin with your EQ controls at the halfway point. This will give you a good place to start that is not overwhelming with any frequency.

From here, you will want to use your EQ to shape your tone.

  1. Use your treble knob to adjust how much brightness you want in your tone. For iron Maiden sounds, this setting was slightly over the halfway mark between 6 and 7. This setting is a good place to start with most high-gain amps.
  2. Your middle control will determine how much thickness is applied to your tone. Too low, and it will sound scooped, which is not the Iron Maiden tone. If you are going for Adrian Smith’s sound, set the mid-knob higher to around 8.
  3. The bass control is used to adjust your lower frequencies and is to be set at a point that is not muddy but clear. This was the aim of the Iron Maiden sound, aggressive but not at the expense of clarity. A bass knob setting of 4-5 should do the trick.

Check out our Metallica amp settings guide once you have Maiden down!

Popular Iron Maiden Songs and Their Settings

While we can get pretty close with a general setting, the truth is Iron Maiden has a large discography that spans many years. With that time frame, they have changed their sounds and equipment from time to time.

And so it’s best to look at amp settings to popular songs to try and recreate the sounds they were able to get from their gear.

The Trooper Amp Settings

The trooper is a popular song and one that many guitarists like to learn to play. Perhaps you are in a cover band, and you need to nail the tone. The good news is, it’s very possible! If you have a Marshall JCM 800 and a TS9, you are all the way there.

For this song, the settings would start with:

  • Gain: 9
  • treble: 7
  • Mids: 8
  • Bass: 7
  • Presence: 6

Now, if you don’t have a JCM800, that’s ok, just back the gain down to 7, the bass to 5, and you should be in the ballpark.

Run To The Hills

Another popular Iron Maiden song is run to the hills from the number of the beast album. This one is similar in settings, as the band has used Marshall amps for a good number of years.

I was able to recreate this tone well with a Revv Generator on the purple channel. My settings were as follows:

  • Gain: 6
  • Treble: 6
  • Mids: 8
  • Bass: 5
  • Presence: 5
  • Depth: 6

If you have a high-gain amp with a decent amount of mid-range and good top-end bite, these settings should get you close.

2 Minutes To Midnight

Another high gain song with a good warm midrange tone is 2 minutes to midnight. It’s fun to play and sounds great. So to capture the tone, again a Marshall amp is suggested.

Use settings like this as a starting point:

  • Gain: 7.5
  • Treble: 7
  • Mids: 8
  • Bass: 5.5
  • Presence: 4.5

If you have a tube screamer, turn the gain down a tad and push the amp harder to open it up with the boost.

Tony Iommi had some cool settings, check them out!

Additional Tips

If you find that you have tried these settings, and it isn’t coming together, there are a few things to keep in mind.

  • The right guitar is important for this sound. You need humbuckers that are high output. Make sure to use the bridge pickup if you want that same rhythm tone.
  • Add effects like delay or reverb to round out the sound. If you find it’s too bright, this can be an easy way to bring it all together.
  • Because the gain is quite high with Iron Maiden’s tone, make sure to keep your bass and depth controls set lower to maintain clarity.
  • If it sounds too thin, increase the mids before the bass. You can get thickness this way without getting muddy. Take advantage of your tone control on the guitar as well.
  • If it’s just too distorted, turn the gain down and adjust your EQ. Yes, it’s possible to have too much gain with certain setups. These settings are starting points, but not every rig is the same.
  • If your amp is just not up to the task, get yourself a good distortion pedal. Not everyone has a high-gain amp. There are plenty of pedals that can get this tone.

Check out our guide on metal amp settings for more!

Conclusion

There you have it! These are some ideas to help you get that Iron Maiden sound. Try these settings and see how they work for you. With a little time and patience, you should be able to get close.

Add effects in the mix to keep building upon these settings. The band used many effect pedals as well, but this is better for you to experiment with once you have the sound down. And who knows, maybe you’ll find something even better!

FAQs

What amps does Iron Maiden use?

Iron Maiden has used many amplifiers over the years. They have mostly stuck with Marshall amps, but they have also used Mesa Boogie, Gallien Krueger, and Blackstar.

What kind of guitars does Iron Maiden use?

Iron Maiden has used Gibson, Jackson, and Ibanez guitars a great deal, but modified Fender Stratocasters with Dimarzio super distortion pickups have been a part of many sessions.

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Don East

My name is Don East, I'm the editor for Killer Rig. I've been playing guitar for over 20 years and have designed and manufactured products like guitar amps, effects pedals, and more. Over the years I have played in many bands and have a deep love for quality gear. I am an electrical engineer and have a passion for music gear, and now want to share what I know with the community!